Month: October 2015

Visiting New Hampshire.

A week in the Lakes Region of the Granite State.

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View from our cottage window as we prepare for today's drive. We're bound for Boston!
View from our cottage window.
Green Acres zfarm in Tilton, specializing in maple syrup, candies and other products made on site with sap tapped from their own trees.
Green Acres Farm in Tilton, specializing in maple syrup, candies and other products made on site with sap tapped from their own trees.
Cemetary within a stone wall. One of many in the area.
Cemetary bordered by a stone wall. One of many in the area.
A local home decorated for Halloween.
A local home decorated for Halloween.
An old mill site in Franklin.
An old mill site in Franklin.
Mill wheel replica.
Mill wheel replica.
A walk along the river trail in Franklin.
A walk along the river trail in Franklin.

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The bridge used by Intetnational Paper in the 19th century to supply the paper mill in Franklin.
The bridge used by Intetnational Paper in the 19th century to supply the paper mill in Franklin.

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Resting on the shore if a lake in Ahern State Park in Laconia.
Resting by a lake in Ahern State Park in Laconia.
Taking a rest on the trail up Mount Major in the Belknap Mountains.
Taking a rest on the trail up Mount Major in the Belknap Mountains.

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The view from the top.
The view from the top.
A drive to the Mount Washington Hotel in Bretton Woods, location of the monetary conference in 1944 where the International Monetary Foundation ad eell as new international banking rules were established in July of 1944.
A drive to the Mount Washington Hotel in Bretton Woods, location of the monetary conference in 1944, where the International Monetary Foundation as well as new international banking rules were established in July of 1944.

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The Gold Room, where the historic agreement was signed.
The Gold Room, where the historic agreement was signed.
Monetary conference delegates.
Monetary conference delegates.
John Maynard Keynes, delegate from the UK.
Henry Morganthau, Jr., FDR’s Secretary of the Treasury, a delegate from USA to the conference.
Henry Morganthau, Jr., left, speaking with UK conference delegate JM Keynes.
Henry Morganthau, Jr., left, speaking with UK conference delegate John Maynard Keynes.
On the hotel veranda.
On the hotel veranda.
Diana's Bath watetfalls.
Diana’s Bath waterfalls.
Cathedral Ledge in the White Mountains.
Cathedral Ledge in the White Mountains.

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Swift River Bridge.
Swift River Bridge.

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Saco River Bridge.

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No, that's not fire on the hillside, it's a blaze of fall color in the sunlight.
No, that’s not fire on the hillside, it’s a blaze of fall color in the sunlight.
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Brilliant fall color on the shore of the local system of lakes.
Our cottage in Tilton.
Our cottage in Tilton, the perfect headquarters for day hikes and leaf-peeping drives through the local countryside.
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Passing through Maine.

Great to be back in the USA!

On to New Hampshire.
On to New Hampshire.

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A simple grave.
A simple grave.
The cemetary where Joshua Chamberlain is buried.
The cemetary where Joshua Chamberlain is buried.
Joshua Chamberlain's home in Brunswick, Maine, today a museum. A decorated civil war Colonel who hero who later became President of Bowdoin College and eventually served as Governor of Maine.
Joshua Chamberlain’s home in Brunswick, Maine, today a museum. A decorated civil war Colonel who later became President of Bowdoin College, he eventually served as Governor of Maine.
Brent lighting the fuse. Time to get out of Bath! Next stop, Brunswick.
Brent lighting the fuse. Time to get out of Bath! Next stop, Brunswick.
An exhibit about international trade in the age of sail.
An exhibit about international trade in the age of sail.
A collection of ship's carpenter's tools from the early 19th century.
A collection of ship’s carpenter’s tools from the early 19th century.
Scrimshaw, a carving on the tooth of a speed whale.
Scrimshaw, a carving on the tooth of a sperm whale.
A tiny model ship built  inside a bottle.
A tiny model ship built inside a bottle.
A painting of the Wyoming, the 6-masted schooner built in the Bath shipyard not far from the site of the museum.
A painting of the Wyoming, the 6-masted schooner built in the Bath shipyard not far from the site of the museum.
Brent considers a whaling harpoon equipped with a hinged point that is shaped like a T. Invented by a Maine blacksmith, it was more difficult to be pulled out once it had penetrated the whale.
Brent considers a whaling harpoon equipped with a hinged point that is shaped like a T. Invented by a Maine blacksmith, it was more difficult to be pulled out once it had penetrated the whale.
Brent weighing anchor inside the museum.
Brent weighing anchor inside the museum.
Maine, Day 2. The Maratime Museum in Bath. This sculpture shows the scale of the 6-masted schooner, the Wyoming built in the local shipyard.
Maine, Day 2. The Maritime Museum in Bath. This sculpture shows the scale of the 6-masted schooner, the Wyoming, built in the local shipyard.

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New England scarecrows. No movie stars or royals here. Just no-nonsense Yankee scarecrows. Eh-yah.
New England scarecrows. No movie stars or royals here. Just no-nonsense Yankee scarecrows.
Eh-yah.
A late afternoon stroll in Camden.
A late afternoon stroll in Camden.
More of Camden.
More of Camden.
The harbor in Camden, Maine.
The harbor in Camden, Maine.
Another view of the bridge.
Another view of the bridge.
Penobscott Narrows suspension bridge, Bucksport.
Penobscott Narrows suspension bridge, across the Penobscott River in Bucksport.
One of New England's many, many picturesque white churches, often with graveyards next door or behind.
One of New England’s many, many picturesque white churches, most with graveyards next door or behind.
Autumn foliage in Bucksport, Maine.
Autumn foliage in Bucksport, Maine.
Maine, Day 1. Blueberry fields in autumn color.
Maine, Day 1. Blueberry fields in autumn color, photographed just after crossing the border.

Visiting the Maritime Provinces.

The ferry taking us sway from Tadoussac, Quebec and toward Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick.
The ferry taking us sway from Tadoussac in Quebec and toward Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick.
Au revoir, Quebec. Halifax or bust!
Au revoir, Quebec. Halifax or bust!
Halifax history.
Halifax history.
Halifax waterfront.
Halifax waterfront.
At the Halifax Maritime Museum.
At the Halifax Maritime Museum.
This museum displayed an impressive collection of small watercraft commonly used in Nova Scotia.
This museum displayed an impressive collection of small watercraft commonly used in Nova Scotia.
Excellent interpretive info about navigation in the waters near Halifax.
Excellent interpretive info about navigation in the waters near Halifax.

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The museum's largest exhibit.
The museum’s largest exhibit, the decommissioned research ship Acadia.
Life boats.
Life boats on Acadia.
Our campsite in Shubie Park Campground, right in Halifax! Urban camping is gggrrrrreat!
Our campsite in Shubie Park Campground, right in Halifax! Urban camping is gggrrrrreat!
A night view of our tent's guy lines.
A night view of our tent’s guy lines.

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Gorgeous landscape on the way to Peggy's Cove on Nova Scotia's South coast.
Gorgeous landscape on the way to Peggy’s Cove on Nova Scotia’s South coast.
Fishing gear at Peggy's Cove.
Fishing gear at Peggy’s Cove.
More views of the fishing trade in Peggy's Cove.
More views of the fishing trade in Peggy’s Cove.
Peggy's Cove is subject to sudden, strong waves. The signage warns everyone to stay off the black rocks, lest you be swept out to sea.
Peggy’s Cove is subject to sudden, strong waves. The signage warns everyone to stay off the black rocks, lest you be swept out to sea.

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We kept well off the black rocks.
We kept well off the black rocks.
The often-photographed lighthouse, Peggy's Cove.
The often-photographed lighthouse, Peggy’s Cove.
On to Indian Harbour.
On to Indian Harbour.
The Finer Diner.
Lunch at the Finer Diner.
Bean salad and a plate of Nova Scotia smoked salmon. Yummmm.
Bean salad and a plate of Nova Scotia smoked salmon. Yummmm.
More of Indian Harbour.
More of Indian Harbour.
Mahone Bay.
Further down the coast to Mahone Bay in time to take in  the local scarecrow festival.
Toto, we're not in Kansas anymore.
Toto, we’re not in Kansas anymore.
Snow White and the Sevens.
Snow White and the Sevens.
Royalty in Mahone Bay.
Royalty in Mahone Bay.
Even Norma Jean was there!
Even Norma Jean was there!
The shore of Mahone Bay, distinguished by its three churches.
The shore of Mahone Bay, distinguished by its three churches.
Moving on towards Lunenberg.
Moving on towards Lunenberg.
Lunenberg.
Downtown Lunenberg.
On the Lunenberg waterfront.
Weather coming in at the Lunenberg waterfront.
The Bluenose II.
The Bluenose II.
Restored Victorians line Lunenberg's streets.
Restored Victorians line Lunenberg’s streets.

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Another lovely Victorian. Moving on now towards Cape Breton Island.
Another lovely Victorian. Moving on now towards Cape Breton Island.
Saint Pierre's Church, Cheticamp, Cape Breton Island.
Saint Pierre’s Church, Cheticamp, Cape Breton Island.
The Cheticamp Place des arts Pete Anselme Chiasson, location of a step dancing performance with live fiddle accompaniment, part of Celtic Colpurs festival all over Cape Breton Island. Dancing by the Forrester Dancers and La Swing du Suete, music by Leanne Aucoin and Kolten MacDonnell, Christine and Sylvie Doucet, and Dawn and Helen MacDonald. Unlike anything you've ever seen.
The Cheticamp Place des arts Pere Anselme Chiasson, location of a step dancing performance with live fiddle accompaniment, part of Celtic Colours festival all across Cape Breton Island. Dancing by the Forrester Dancers and La Swing du Suete, music by Leanne Aucoin and Kolten MacDonnell, Christine and Sylvie Doucet, and Dawn and Helen MacDonald. Unlike anything you’ve ever seen. But photos forbidden, so no visual.
Our camp site at Linwood, Cape Breton Island.
Our camp site at Linwood, Cape Breton Island.
End of camping season in Linwood. Good thing. Quite chilly here. Brrrrrrr. Could be time to move indoors soon.
End of camping season in Linwood. Good thing. Quite chilly here. Brrrrrrr. Could be time to move indoors soon.
Lobster boats on Bras D'or, which means Arm if Gold. An inland lake on Cape Breton Island, partly salt water because it has narrow openings to the ocean.
Lobster boats on Bras D’or, which means Arm of Gold. An inland lake on Cape Breton Island, partly salt water because it has narrow openings to the ocean. Some say the lake was named because early settlers saw the sun glinting golden on the water. Others say it’s a shortened version of Lake Labrador, its original name.
In Quebec, road signs are both English and French. On Cape Breton Island, they're English and Gaelic.
In Quebec, road signs are both English and French. On Cape Breton Island, they’re English and Gaelic.

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Autumn foliage along the Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island.
Autumn foliage along the Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island.
Our cabin in Dingwall, on the north shore of Cape Breton.
Our cabin in Dingwall, on the north shore of Cape Breton.
Cabin interioir.
Cabin interioir.
View from cabin porch.
View from cabin porch.
On the road to Louisbourg, along Cape Breton's East shore.
On the road to Louisburg, along Cape Breton’s East shore.

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This fountain was installed to celebrate Louisbourg's centennial in1967.
This fountain was installed to celebrate Louisburg’s centennial in 1967.
Our campsite in Louisbourg.
Our campsite in Louisburg.
New friends Karen and Paul from Battleground, WA. We met in the campground at Loiusbourg. What are the odds?
New friends Karen and Paul from Battleground, WA. We met in the campground at Loiusburg. What are the odds?

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Louisbourg's train station.
Louisburg’s train station.
Louisbourg Playhouse, where we enjoyed a Celtic Colours traditional Cape Breton style Gaelic/Irish music performance by Lucy MacNeil and her two brothers plus artist in residence Liz Doherty from Donegal, Ireland and a number of other guest artists. Our feet would not keep still. This experience was worth the trip.
Louisburg Playhouse, where we enjoyed a Celtic Colours Festival performance of traditional Cape Breton style Gaelic/Irish music.
The show featured Lucy, Boyd and Stewart MacNeil; Liz Doherty, Aidan O'Donnell, Fintan Vallely, and Gino Lupari. These artists were joined by many others throughout the evening, building to a finale with 18 fiddles, an accordion, piano, flute and traditional Irish/Gaelic drumming. WOW!!!
The show featured Lucy, Boyd and Stewart MacNeil; Liz Doherty; Aidan O’Donnell; Fintan Vallely and Gino Lupari. These artists were joined by many others throughout the evening, building to a finale with 18 fiddles, an accordion, piano, flute and traditional Irish/Gaelic drumming. WOW!!! This performance was worth the trip.
The restored fortress and village at Louisbourg, an early 18th-century planned city and strategic fortification for France's defense of Cape Breton, then called Isle de Royal. Louis XV was king of France. It was destroyed after capture by the British during the French and Indian Wars. Canada Parks has retored about 20% of the original town and fortifications. It's now maintained as a living history museum with interpretive talks by costumed personnel, mostly volunteers.
The restored fortress and village at Louisbourg, an early 18th-century planned city and strategic fortification for France’s defense of Cape Breton, then called Isle de Royal. Louis XV was king of France. It was destroyed after capture by the British during the French and Indian Wars. Canada Parks has retored about 20% of the original town and fortifications. It’s now maintained as a living history museum with interpretive talks by costumed personnel, mostly volunteers.
Preserved plan documents for the Village and fort.
Preserved plan documents for the village and fort.

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Medal awarded to the original planner--engineer and cartographer Jean Francois du Vergery de Verville.
Medal awarded to the original planner–engineer and cartographer Jean Francois du Vergery de Verville.
A model of the fortress and village.
A model of the fortress and village.
The gate and main entrance to the village from the harbor.
The gate and main entrance from the harbor to the village’s main street.
The inn on the village main street.
The inn on the village main street.
Tables set inside the inn, awaiting customers.
Tables set inside the inn, awaiting customers.
Village street.
Village street.
Lawn maintenance crew blocking a village street.
Lawn maintenance crew blocking a village street.
A vegetable and herb garden behind a village home.
A vegetable and herb garden behind a village home.
Well inside a village building.
Well inside a village building.
A warehouse in the village.
A warehouse in the village.
The king's bastion, including residences for the governor, officers, and soldier's barracks.
The king’s bastion, including residences for the governor, officers, and soldier’s barracks.
Standing guard inside the fortress.
Standing guard inside the fortress.
Approximatell 4000 soldiers were stationed at the fortress. Many were recruited from the streets of Paris, petty criminals or other men in need of money. After their pay was docked for uniforms, room and board, and food most were like indentured servants who couldn't leave service.
Approximately 4000 soldiers were stationed at the fortress. Many were recruited from the streets of Paris, petty criminals or other men in need of money. After their pay was docked for uniforms, room and board, and food most were like indentured servants who couldn’t afford to leave service at Louisbourg.
Cannon on the fortress wall facing the harbor. The surface under them is slanted upward so when the cannon are fired they will automatically roll back into position, saving manpower and valuable time under attack.
Cannon on the fortress wall facing the harbor. The surface under them is slanted upward away from the wall so when fired the cannon will automatically roll back into position, saving manpower and valuable time under attack.

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Inside the fortress.
Inside the fortress.
The governor's residence, inside the king's bastion.
The governor’s residence, inside the king’s bastion.
The governor's council chamber,where trials were held.
The governor’s council chamber,where trials were held.
Monument to the mums who ran a convent in the village, educating girls from both wealthy and poor families. Many girls from Louisbourg learned to read and write thanks to their work. The nuns were eventually sent away after the British captured the fortress.
In the unrestored section, a monument to the nuns who ran a convent in the village, educating girls from both wealthy and poor families. Many girls from Louisbourg learned to read and write thanks to the nuns’ work. The nuns were eventually sent away after the British captured the fortress.
The site of a tavern in the village owned by Marie Margaret Rose, a freed slave. She was brought to Louisbourg from Guinea, Africa at age 19. She cooked, cleaned and raised the 12 children of the Lippincott family, in addition to caring for her own child delivered when she was 21. No father was named for her child, but it's likely that he was her master. After she was freed, she married a MiqMak named Jean-Baptiste. She was the first freed slave in North America to own and run her own business.her freedom was short-lived. She died about 18 months after the Lippincott family freed her.
The site of a tavern in the village owned by Marie Margaret Rose, a freed slave. She was brought to Louisbourg from Guinea, Africa at age 19. She cooked, cleaned and raised the 12 children of the Lippincott family, in addition to caring for her own child delivered when she was 21. No father was named for her child, but it’s likely that he was her master. After she was freed, she married a MiqMak named Jean-Baptiste. She was the first freed slave in North America to own and run her own business. Her freedom was short-lived. She died about 18 months after the Lippincott family freed her.
A painting of the fortress and village in its heyday.
A painting of the fortress and village in its heyday.
Color along the road to Prince Edward Island.
Color along the road to Prince Edward Island.
Our cottage on Prince Edward Island, on the South Central coast.
Our cottage on Prince Edward Island, on the South Central coast.
The view from our front deck.
The view from our front deck.
A walk on the beach.
A walk on the beach.
A visit to Green Gables Farm in Cavendish on Prince Edward Island.
A visit to Green Gables Farm in Cavendish on Prince Edward Island.

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The barn.
The barn.
A walk through the woods near the farm.
A walk through the woods near the farm.
The roads and dirt on the island are very, very red.
The roads and dirt on the island are very, very red.
A cold day on the beach.
A cold day on the beach.
Rural Prince Edward Island.
Rural Prince Edward Island.

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Heading off the island down a country lane.
Heading off the island down a country lane.
The bridge to Nova Scotia and on to New Brunswick.
The bridge to Nova Scotia and on to New Brunswick and the Bay of Fundy.
The gazebo in the lovely downtown Park, Saint John's, New Brunswick.
The gazebo in the lovely downtown Park, Saint John’s, New Brunswick.
Lunch from the Bay of Fundy: fish n chips for Brent, scallops n chips for Patty. Tidbits from both for Phoebe and Daphne. Yummmm!
Lunch from the Bay of Fundy: fish n chips for Brent, scallops n chips for Patty. Tidbits from both for Phoebe and Daphne. Yummmm!
A sign beside the entrance to our lunch spot. Benedict Arnold eventually moved to Saint John's after he shifted his loyalty to the British. He, along with thousands of 'loyalists,' resettled in New Brunswick after the American Revolution.
A sign beside the entrance to our lunch spot. Benedict Arnold eventually moved to Saint John’s after he shifted his loyalty to the British. He, along with thousands of ‘loyalists,’ resettled in New Brunswick after the American Revolution.
Our cottage in Bocabec overlooking the Bay of Fundy.
Our cottage in Bocabec overlooking the Bay of Fundy.
The view out our cottage window.
The view out our cottage window.
The Bay, seen from our front step.
The Bay, seen from our front step.
Saint Andrew
Saint Andrew”s, New Brunswick.
More of Saint Andrew's.
More of Saint Andrew’s.
The Bay of Fundy, 40 minutes before low tide.
The Bay of Fundy, 40 minutes before low tide.

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The channel marker, high and dry.
The channel marker, high and dry.